Who I ride for…Please Support the 2016 Boston Brain Tumor Ride

Over 300 stories. 300 unique experiences. Patients, survivors, family, friends…everyone in some way had a connection to the devastation caused by brain tumors. To sit in a room with these 300 people was humbling because they represented a web of countless others whose lives have been impacted by a brain tumor.

Last week, I was in D.C. with these 300 individuals from across the United States for the National Brain Tumor Society’s Head to the Hill advocacy event. Together, we pushed Congress to support the brain tumor community. Over 700,000 Americans are living with a brain tumor. That number though does not fully capture the scale of this problem. If you are familiar with my story, you know that so many others, including my family and friends, have been impacted in some way by my cancer. This disease changes lives, both for patients and caregivers. If we are to truly give justice to the impacts left by brain tumors then we need to consider all the lives that are changed. The children who loose a parent too soon. The parents who have to do the unthinkable, and say goodbye to their children for the last time. The husbands and wives, whose partners depart far too early.

Since my recurrence I have had the fortune to meet some of the most incredible people, patients and caregivers, who are dealing with a brain tumor. One of these groups that I am incredibly proud and lucky to be a part of is the Massachusetts advocacy team for Head to the Hill. Advocating for the brain tumor community at the Capital is rewarding, but what I love most about going to D.C. every year for this event is meeting all of the other advocates. They are the epitome of perseverance, courage, hope, and love.

This year it was great to see old friends, and meet some amazing new people. It was surreal to think that it had only been a year since I was at the Capitol pushing through my first round of chemotherapy. A year ago, I could only focus on the present because the future was so uncertain, but last week I had the privilege to talk about and look towards my future. I am incredibly lucky my journey has turned out this way. Some people from our team last year were not able to make it to D.C. because their tumors had progressed. They are the reason I went to D.C. again for my second year, and why I continue to ride in the Boston Brain Tumor Ride.

They and their caregivers are my heroes. Despite overwhelming diagnoses, they have embraced life, supported others, and brought light and love to everyone around them. I have only met these families a handful of times in person, but they have taught me a lifetime of lessons. 

In just 5 days at the 2016 Boston Brain Tumor Ride, I will ride for them. I will ride for the mothers I have met who fight for their children even after they have passed. I will ride for the young adults I have met at Dana Farber who gracefully balance uncertainty and living. I will ride for the fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, husbands and wives, boyfriends and girlfriends, children, and countless others whose lives have been impacted by a brain tumor. I ride because I can, and sadly many others cannot.

More than a year following my recurrence I am doing well not because of anything I have done, but simply because I am lucky. Lucky to have a tumor that is slow growing. Lucky to have access to the best medical care and resources available. And lucky to have the support of my family and friends. With this privilege, I have a responsibility to stand up for and support the brain tumor community. We are on the cusp of so many great discoveries in improved treatments, and perhaps someday a cure. But we won’t get there unless we all come together to take action. For all of those who are, and for all of those who will face a brain tumor diagnosis, please donate to the Boston Brain Tumor Ride.

Click HERE to join and/or donate to our team for the 2016 Boston Brain Tumor Ride