Discharged!

72 hours after an awake brain surgery, somehow we're out the door, with a cane, and on our way to outpatient recovery! Lot's of rehab (and sleep) ahead, but tremendously thankful to my family and the UCSF medical team (especially my surgeon Dr. Hervey-Jumper and the amazing nurses)! I'll write later about this surreal experience …

Making progress: update 5/24 from Jenn (Jeremy’s Sister)

Jeremy officially moved to the Neuro inpatient floor into his own private suite. He is all settled in with family/friend pictures and photos of orcas. He has been visited by occupational therapy and physical therapy to assess his function and we will find out soon what their recommendations are post inpatient. Jeremy was able to …

How to Help

I am writing this the night before going into surgery, so before you read below on ways to help, please know that if we have crossed paths in life, you have already provided me more than I could ever ask for. I believe our lives are a tapestry of the people we meet and the …

Treatment Meetings and Plan

Warning: This post is long! This is not the usual post where I dive into the emotional aspects of my experience. Rather, this is a pretty cut and dry description of my three weeks of meetings and calls to develop a treatment plan. During my 2014 recurrence, I wrote a similar (...yet less detailed) post about treatment decisions. I received a lot of messages from patients and family members of patients who found that post helpful. This is for that audience. My hope is that this very detailed explanation of my treatment meetings may shed some light on how much information is involved in informing a treatment plan. While I share a lot of detail, I want to note that this is my experience. Every individual's situation and decisions will be unique to them.

When the can doesn’t land as far as you hoped – another recurrence

Introduction: Living with brain cancer I always told people it was a matter of "When" not "If" my tumor would start growing again. It was one of the few certainties in a journey of uncertainty. During my recurrence in 2014, my tumor extended into the motor strip making a complete resection impossible. I had to …

Why This Blog?

Vulnerability is scary. To share my story, and the complex emotions intertwined with my journey, is daunting. When I started this blog during my recurrence in 2014, it served as a platform to update my community spread across the globe. It was also a form of therapeutic reflection. Over time, I didn't expect the impact …